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                    WELCOME To My  Home of Goldendoodles

                 I have been  breeding  Golden Retrievers for  over 23 years and recently have had several

                              requests for Goldendoodles. Although reluctant at first, I decided to dive into the 

                      Goldendoodle world  after our own Klondike Bear sired a litter of gorgeous Goldendoodle 

                puppies. So, I decided to purchase my own apricot male Standard Poodle. Louie, who has excellent 

                    hip, heart and elbow clearances,  is up to date on eye CERf.  




                             Go to my new site for pictures






                                             When puppies go to new  homes

  • 1st set of vaccinations

  • Will be wormed  3 times

  • Heath Certificate from  my vet

  • Vaccination & deworming record

  • Sample of my puppy  food ( ProPlan puppy food)

  • Blanket with the smell of me and sibling 

  • Lifetime of help

                                       Click here Goldendoodle (Puppy Application Form






                                                         These above are the last litter of goldendoodles  his name is Mokey!!!

                                    Below is mokey brother Oliver


The Goldendoodle is actually not a pure bred dog. Instead, it's a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle. The name itself was invented in 1992, and comes from a hybrid of "golden" for the golden retriever, and from " These dogs were first bred in the mid-1990s, specifically in an attempt to come up with a family pet that was larger and allergy free. These dogs have become very popular, and are a very beloved new goldendoodle hybrid


About the term "Goldendoodle"
The name "Goldendoodle" came about as a direct result of the Labradoodle, which was introduced by Wally Conron in the 1990s. In 1992, the Neelands family came up with the term "Goldendoodle" when someone mistakenly identified their dog, Sugar, as a Labradoodle. They said, "No, she's a Goldendoodle," and the term has stuck.

First generation dogs
This hybrid mix is largely made up of what is known as a first generation cross, meaning that most dogs are first generation mixes. Their parents, in other words, are each a golden retriever and a poodle, rather than two Goldendoodles. This speaks well to the hybrid's health, because first generation mixes are generally much more vigorous and much healthier than subsequent inbred generations. Their personalities are also much more likely to be family friendly, in that they are generally very friendly and affectionate, as well as easy to train and intelligent. They make excellent family pets and  and because they are part poodle, they generally shed very little. This makes them perfect pets for those with allergies.

Although Goldendoodles are unique in that they are first generation dogs, their ancestry comes from their parents, namely, the golden retriever and the poodle. These dogs are hunters and water dogs by instinct, and both types like to work and have something to do. They are very, very affectionate with humans, and are generally easygoing and easily trained.

Types of Goldendoodles
First generation
The first generation standard-sized Goldendoodle is the offspring of a golden retriever and a poodle. The first Goldendoodles bred were hybrids of the standard poodle and a golden retriever. 

A Goldendoodle produced by breeding a first generation Goldendoodle with a poodle is called a "backcross." The backcross Goldendoodle is much more likely than the first generation Goldendoodle to have no shedding problems at all, making it a great family pet for those with severe allergies. By contrast, the first generation Goldendoodle is a very low shedding dog, but it may not be entirely non-shedding.

Second generation
A few breeders are now breeding Goldendoodles with Goldendoodles, for a true second generation standalone breed.

Sizes of Goldendoodles
As with the poodle, the Goldendoodle can be of different sizes, depending on the parentage. A standard Goldendoodle is a Labrador retriever bred with a standard poodle, and they can reach 45 pounds and more at adulthood. They can occasionally reach as much as or even more than 100 pounds.

A medium Goldendoodle weighs between 30 and 45 pounds, and is the result of a medium sized poodle being bred with a golden retriever.

The miniature Goldendoodle weighs between 15 and 30 pounds, and is the result of a miniature poodle bred with a golden retriever.

The Goldendoodle can look like a shaggy poodle or one that has had its curls relaxed. It can also look more like a large golden retriever with shaggy or curly hair. Depending on the dominance of characteristics, Goldendoodles will look more like a golden retriever or poodle, but can also have their own unique appearance of something in between. They can be just about any color, from chocolate, apricot, cream, gold, red, black, etc. At full adult size, the standard-sized Goldendoodle usually weighs about 45 pounds or more. Occasionally, they can reach 100 pounds or more.

Many Goldendoodles have the standard "golden retriever bump" on the top of the head, for a particularly unique appearance.

Goldendoodles are friendly, affable, very intelligent and highly energetic dogs that thrive on human companionship but love other dogs, too. They are perfect for multi pet households but do require a lot of attention, as well. With proper discipline and training, they are very easygoing dogs that make perfect pets even for families with small children.

Because they're so intelligent and easily trained, they make perfect service dogs and family pets, both. They are generally very friendly toward children as well, but because of their poodle characteristics especially, they can be high strung and can exhibit "alpha dog" characteristics toward their humans if they are not properly trained right away; they absolutely must have guidance and structure if they are to be well behaved. As with the poodle, they are so intelligent that they can actually pick up on whether not an owner is weak minded and can be dominated. In short, if the Goldendoodle can dominate its owner, it will. Because of that, the owner of the Goldendoodle must be calm but assertive and establish "top dog" status right away while the new family member is still a puppy.

Because of their intelligence, Goldendoodles love to have something to do and are eager to learn. Utterly devoted to those they love, they are also friendly toward strangers, including other dogs, and are best when they live in very social situations.

They can get bored, and are best behaved when they are kept busy. If they spend a lot of time alone, they can get into trouble simply because they crave attention and something to do; because they don't like to spend time alone and are very social dogs, they can develop behavioral problems if forced to be alone a lot.

Their unique personality (friendly, open, loving, very eager to please and high energy) makes them great service dogs. As long as they are trained properly in that they are given proper discipline and boundaries, they are very friendly and very easygoing, not prone to behavioral problems except in the situations mentioned previously. 

Goldendoodles need a fair amount of activity to be happy and healthy, and as stated previously, have lots of energy. Because of that, they need daily walks as part of an exercise schedule, but they also simply love to have their days full of busy activity. Although the Goldendoodle is a high energy dog, it does do well in small space situations like apartment living, as long as it's given adequate exercise.

Goldendoodles are very, very low maintenance. They shed very little if at all (especially depending on whether not they are first generation Goldendoodles, which can tend to shed a little bit as compared to the backcross, which is a Goldendoodle bred with a poodle; the backcross is much more likely to not shed at all).

Goldendoodles do need to be regularly brushed (to prevent tangles and/or remove any loose hair, if applicable). They will also need regular trims.

Luckily, Goldendoodles are hybrids, which means that they are generally healthier and hardier than either parent line. They can have problems prevalent with their parent lines, such as hip dysplasia and Von Willebrand disease. However, these problems are less prevalent than they are with the parent lines, and the overall health of the hybrid is much better even than that for the pure breed parents, in general.

Veterinary care
Because Goldendoodles are so hardy, they may not exhibit symptoms of illness until they're quite sick. Regular care is a must to keep your dog happy and healthy.

On average, these dogs live about 15 years, very long lived especially for what can be large dogs. 

Are there any situations where getting a Goldendoodle for a pet is not a good idea?
If you live alone and are going to be gone a lot, it's not a good idea to get a Goldendoodle. The Goldendoodle is an extremely affectionate, intelligent and loyal dog, but it absolutely must have human company at all times. It craves attention and must have discipline and boundaries for best behavior. Therefore, if you've got a lot of time and attention to give, and you want a good companion dog or pet, the Goldendoodle is perfect for you. If you don't, however, it's best to get a breed that requires less attention and discipline.